Ecclesiology of the Cross – The Pillar and Ground of Truth – Part 2

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I suggested in my previous post on this topic that the Cross be a central part of our understanding of the Church. There is a natural tendency to compartmentalize in theology – it’s hard to think of everything all the time and everywhere. And yet, it is important that we always remember that our salvation is not a series of discreet, compartmentalized events and undertakings – our salvation is one thing. Thus it is never entirely appropriate to speak of the Eucharist as one thing, Confession as another, Christology as another, iconography as another, etc. – everything, all of our faith, is one. All is encompassed in the saving work of Christ. It is hard for us to think like this but it is important to make the effort.

I would like to suggest several points for reflection on the Cross and the Church:

1. The self-emptying of God on the Cross, including his descent into Hades, is not accidental but utterly integral to understanding the saving work of Christ.

2. Any imitation of God, any conformity of our life to His, will involve this same self-emptying.

3. All discussion of the Church and its life, must include this self-emptying, not only of God, but of each of the members of the Church.

4. Every description of the various aspects of the Church would do well to include the self-emptying of God and the self-emptying of Christians in imitation of the God Who Saves.

Today, the first point:

1. When St. Paul writes of Christ’s “emptying” Himself (Phil 2:5-11), he is not describing something that is somehow alien to God, regardless of its profound irony. In Rev. 13:8 Christ is described as the “lamb slain from the foundation of the world.” Thus we cannot look at the Cross as an event that is somehow alien to God. Rather, it is a revelation of Who God Is, perhaps the fullest revelation that we receive.

Christ speaks of his crucifixion, saying, “for this cause came I unto this hour”  (John 12:27).   Other aspects of Christ’s ministry, even His revelation of the Father to the world, should not be separated from the event of the Cross. In His self-emptying, Christ reveals the true character God: Father, Son and Holy Spirit.

Writing about this self-emptying (kenosis), Fr. Nicholas Sakharov describes its place in the teachings of the Elder Sophrony:

The eternal aspect of Christ’s kenosis is perceived in the framework of the kenotic intratrinitarian love. Fr. Sophrony remarks that before Christ accomplished his earthly kenosis, “it had already been accomplished in heaven according to his divinity in relation to the Father.” The earthly kenosis is thus a manifestation of the heavenly: “Through him [Christ] we are given revelation about the nature of God-Love. The perfection consists in that this love humbly, without reservations, gives itself over. The Father in the generation of the Son pours himself out entirely. But the Son returns all things to the Father” (I Love Therefore I Am, 95).

Indeed, in this understanding we would say that this self-emptying is not only integral to Christ’s saving work, but to the revelation of the Triune God. Thus when we say, “God is love,” we understand that God pours Himself out: Father, Son and Holy Spirit. It is into this life of self-emptying that we are grafted in our salvation. We lose our life in order to save it. This is no reference to a single act, but to the character of the whole of our life as it is found in Christ. “I am crucified with Christ, nevertheless I live” (Galatians 2:20).

Tomorrow: the second point, “Any imitation of God, any conformity of our life to His, will involve this same self-emptying.”

3 Responses to “Ecclesiology of the Cross – The Pillar and Ground of Truth – Part 2”

  1. Pontifications » Blog Archive » Why the Orthodox Should Refuse to Fight - Part 2 Says:

    […] I have posted a second article on the Church as the Pillar and Ground of the Truth on my website Glory to God for All Things. This is one of a multipart series on the Cross and it’s place in ecclesiology. Read if you’re interested. Comments are welcome. […]

  2. Barnabas Powell Says:

    Father,

    I am enjoying (is that the right word?) your reflections.

    I am wondering though if this emphasis on the Cross in theinking about the mystery of the Church is itself a compartmentalization.

    You admit that avoiding this is very difficult and I agree.

    Is there room in this reflection for the paradox of self-emptying and being filled all at the same time?

    If I may borrow a phrase from a Protestant theologian (George E. Ladd) It is the Paradox of the already/not yet.

    It seems that any ecclesiology, of necessity, contains eschatology as well. Perhaps you are getting to this and I am jumping the gun.

    In any event, I am contemplating your words. Thank you.

  3. Fr. Stephen Freeman Says:

    Barnabas,

    You’re right on several points. The aspect of the cross, is but one aspect, my pointing it out is to look at a neglected aspect of our life as Church. And it is indeed eschatogical, but I will get to that as I work my way through these points. Thanks and God bless!

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