To Cultivate a Forgiving Heart

Nothing is more difficult to our heart than forgiveness of our enemies. Forgiveness of anything is hard for some, while forgiveness of everyone for everything is God-like. As we progress towards Great Lent, we progress towards the place where only forgiveness (both given and received) will move us closer to the goal of union with the Good God.

I cannot think that any of my readers is a stranger to forgiveness, either the need to be forgiven or the need to forgive. The need to forgive, according to the commandment of Christ, extends well beyond those who ask for our forgiveness: we are commanded to forgive our enemies – whom I presume would rarely want to ask for our forgiveness.

Of course, our experience of those who are truly enemies is that we do not want to forgive them. We do not trust them; the wound has been too deep; their offense is not against us but against someone we love who is particularly vulnerable. I could enlarge the list but we are all too familiar with it. The reasons we find it hard to forgive our enemies are endless.

But the commandment remains – not as a counsel of how to live a healthier, happier life – but with the added reminder that we will only find forgiveness as we forgive. Forgiveness is not optional: it is a fundamental spiritual action which we must learn to use as though our salvation depended upon it – for it does.

Several times in Scripture forgiveness of others (including enemies) is linked with our becoming like God, being conformed to His image. Thus when I think of forgiveness I think as well of the whole life of salvation – for the path to being restored to the fullness of the image of Christ runs directly through the forgiveness of our enemies. It may indeed be the very key to our salvation (as it is worked out in us) and its most accurate measure.

Having said that, however, is also to say that this commandment to forgive is not of man – we do not have it in us to fullfill this commandment in and of ourselves. St. Gregory of Nyssa once said that “man is mud whom God has commanded to become God.” Of course it is utterly and completely impossible for mud to do such a thing (unless God make it so).

All that being said, grace is the foundation of forgiveness. We pray for forgiveness to enter our heart. We beg for forgiveness to enter our heart. We importune God for forgiveness to enter our heart.

Even as a product of grace – we do not begin with the hardest things but with the easiest. We do not begin fasting by tackling the most strict regimen. We do not begin prayer with an effort to pray continually for forty days (or some other great feat). Such efforts would either crush us with their difficulty or crush us with our success.

These are a few thoughts on beginning the life of forgiveness:

1. Begin by struggling to form the habit of forgiveness in the smallest things. With a child, with traffic, with little irritations. Do not struggle in a small way but throw yourself into forgiveness. It should become a habit, but a habit of grace, a large action.

2. Use this prayer for the enemies who seem to be beyond your ability to pray: “O God, at the dread judgment, do not condemn them for my sake.” This places forgiveness at a distance and even a hard heart can often manage the small prayer of forgiveness at such a distance.

3. Be always aware of your own failings and constantly ask for God’s forgiveness. “Lord, Jesus Christ, Son of God, have mercy on me a sinner.”

4. As much as possible cultivate in your heart the understanding that all human beings are broken and victims of the fall. None of us enters a world of purity, nor do we enter the world fully fuctional as a human being. Life offers us the possibility of the gradual cultivation of mercy in our heart. Many will complain that our culture already has a “cult of victimization” in which no one takes responsibility for their actions. The same people may well imagine that the world would be better if only everyone took more responsibility. But they themselves will not take on the responsibility that belong to us all. As Dostoevsky says, “Each man is responsible for everything before everyone.” Thus the complaint comes out of our pride. We think we ourselves are not responsible for the state of the world as it is and that if only others were as good as we, the world would be better. This is a lie.

5. The proper response to taking such responsibility is to pray and ask forgiveness. Feeling guilty is generally another self-centered action and is not the same thing as asking forgiveness.

6. Make a life confession at least once a year – being careful to name as many resentments as you can remember (this last advice comes from Met. Jonah Paffhausen).

But I say to you that hear, Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who abuse you. To him who strikes you on the cheek, offer the other also; and from him who takes away your coat do not withhold even your shirt. Give to every one who begs from you; and of him who takes away your goods do not ask them again. And as you wish that men would do to you, do so to them. “If you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. And if you do good to those who do good to you, what credit is that to you? For even sinners do the same. And if you lend to those from whom you hope to receive, what credit is that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, to receive as much again. But love your enemies, and do good, and lend, expecting nothing in return; and your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High; for he is kind to the ungrateful and the selfish. Be merciful, even as your Father is merciful. “Judge not, and you will not be judged; condemn not, and you will not be condemned; forgive, and you will be forgiven; give, and it will be given to you; good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over, will be put into your lap. For the measure you give will be the measure you get back (Luke 6:27-38).

 

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11 Responses to “To Cultivate a Forgiving Heart”

  1. Audrey Says:

    I particularly like the quotes by St. Gregory of Nyssa and Dostoyevski. We are commanded to forgive continually but can only do it with God’s help, and we must take responsibility for ourselves and not look at what we think others should be doing. This post is very helpful.

  2. Darrell Lahay Says:

    Pray for me Father!

    Great practical spiritual advice…So often people preach forgiveness, but leave out the nuts and bolts of how to actually get really good at it..

    I am going to read this post to my students today..

    Shalom

  3. Aunt Melanie Says:

    I have happily discovered your blog. Your material has provided validation, clarification, inspiration. And the photograph on this post really leaves a lasting image in the mind and heart.

  4. Tweets that mention To Cultivate a Forgiving Heart « Glory to God for All Things -- Topsy.com Says:

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Kees Voorhoeve, Veronica Paddy. Veronica Paddy said: To Cultivate a Forgiving Heart – Nothing is more difficult to our heart than forgiveness of our enemies. Forgiveness… http://ow.ly/1bfO8t […]

  5. Lina Says:

    Several weeks ago during divine liturgy I was struck by how many times we say, “Lord, have mercy!” The Jesus prayer leads us to beg for mercy. We beg our Lord for mercy for ourselves, yet how often do we extend our mercy to others?

  6. Margaret Says:

    Thank you for this post, Fr. Stephen! God bless you and yours!

  7. To Cultivate Forgiveness | Being mediocre Says:

    […] Cultivate Forgiveness Posted on February 10, 2011 by John| Leave a comment Here is another link to Father Stephen’s blog, this time a post regarding forgiveness. How […]

  8. Forgiveness « simply me Says:

    […] Forgiveness Instead of running around in circles with my words, trying to explain some things I’ve been realizing and learning about in regards to forgiveness, I will just link to a blog that my dad recommended. The entry is, “To Cultivate a Forgiving Heart.” […]

  9. [The Daily Post] Regaining Lost Trust « The Painted Turtle Says:

    […] To cultivate a forgiving heart (fatherstephen.wordpress.com) […]

  10. THE HEART | The Church Fathers Says:

    […] Grace of Just Showing Up To Cultivate a Forgiving Heart […]

  11. The Heart | The Church Fathers Says:

    […] Culture and Religion, Making the Journey of Faith « The Grace of Just Showing Up To Cultivate a Forgiving Heart […]

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